Infrared Thermography

Infrared monitoring and analysis can be used from low-speed equipment to high-speed equipment, and can be effective for spotting both electrical and mechanical failures. Oftentimes, infrared has been said to be the most cost-effective technology available. Infrared technology can be defined as the process of generating visual images that represent variations of IR radiance of surfaces of objects. IR radiation falls outside that of visible light and therefore, it’s invisible to the naked eye. However, an IR camera or similar device allows us to escape the visible light spectrum and view an object based on temperature. Why is this important? Similar to other predictive maintenance technologies, IR attempts to detect the presence of stressors or conditions that will decrease the life of your equipment.

For example, rotating equipment problems are normally the result of frictional changes that can be detected in the thermal profile.

The following list contains just a few of the possible electrical system application examples:

Transmission lines
Splices
Shoes/end bells
Inductive heating problems
Insulators
Cracked or damaged/tracking
Distribution lines/systems
Splices
Line clamps
Disconnects
Oil switches/breakers
Capacitors
Pole-mounted transformers
Lightning arrestors
Imbalances
Substations
Disconnects, cutouts, air switches
Oil-illed switches/breakers (external and internal faults)
Capacitors
Transformers
Internal problems
Bushings
Oil levels
Cooling tubes
Lightning arrestors
Bus connections
Generator Facilities
Generator
Bearings
Brushes
Windings
Coolant/oil lines: blockage
Motors
Connections
Winding/cooling patterns
Motor Control Center
Imbalances
In-Plant Electrical Systems
Switchgear
Bus
Cable trays
Batteries and charging circuits
Power/Lighting distribution panels